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Adrian

Adrian

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Also Known As: Adrian, Adrian Adolph Greenberg Died: September 13, 1959
Born: March 3, 1903 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Naugatuck, Connecticut, USA Profession:

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Italian-German actor Mario Adorf has built an impressive career, that has stretched across six decades and two continents, resulting in numerous award nominations. Adorf's first on-screen appearance was in the 1954 World War I drama "08/15," which led to consistent work in motion pictures, and later, television. Some of Adorf's best-known roles include 1957's serial-killer thriller "The Devil Strikes at Night," 1972's crime drama "Caliber 9," and the lead role in 1979's controversial adaptation of Gunter Grass's fantasia "The Tin Drum," among others. Adorf is also known for supposedly turning down roles in movies that would go on to become classics: Francis Ford Coppola's mobster masterpiece "The Godfather," Billy Wilder's hectic Cold War satire "One, Two, Three," and Sam Peckinpah's violent revisionist western "The Wild Bunch." Celebrating his 80th birthday in 2010, Adorf continued to act well into the early 21st century, largely in movies made for German or Italian television.

Italian-German actor Mario Adorf has built an impressive career, that has stretched across six decades and two continents, resulting in numerous award nominations. Adorf's first on-screen appearance was in the 1954 World War I drama "08/15," which led to consistent work in motion pictures, and later, television. Some of Adorf's best-known roles include 1957's serial-killer thriller "The Devil Strikes at Night," 1972's crime drama "Caliber 9," and the lead role in 1979's controversial adaptation of Gunter Grass's fantasia "The Tin Drum," among others. Adorf is also known for supposedly turning down roles in movies that would go on to become classics: Francis Ford Coppola's mobster masterpiece "The Godfather," Billy Wilder's hectic Cold War satire "One, Two, Three," and Sam Peckinpah's violent revisionist western "The Wild Bunch." Celebrating his 80th birthday in 2010, Adorf continued to act well into the early 21st century, largely in movies made for German or Italian television.

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Contributions

Radkins ( 2009-05-06 )

Source: not available

Adrian Adolph Greenburg. Born March 3, 1903 in Naugatuck, CT. Studied costume and set design in New York and Paris. Discovered in Paris by Irving Berlin, he returned to the U.S. in the fall of 1922. He designed costumes for the 1923, 1924 and 1925 "Music Box Revue" and for others. While in New York he designed film costumes for Mae Murray and Rudolph Valentino. He was head of wardrobe for the DeMille studio from 1926 to 1928 and followed the director to M.G.M. in 1928 where Adrian designed for all of the studio's leading ladies until his departure in 1941, following the poor reception to the "Americanization" of Greta Garbo in "Two Faced Woman." He established a dress salon in Beverly Hills and New York which he operated until a heart attack in 1952 led to their closure. His last film was the 1952 M.G.M. remake of "Roberta" titled "Lovely to Look at". He continued to be active in designing menswear and exhibiting his African paintings. He returned to theatre in 1958, designing for the Paul Muni production of "Grand Hotel" and "Camelot" in 1959. He died during the preparation of "Camelot." He was survived by his wife of 20 years, actress Janet Gaynor and a son, Robin.

Rianne99 ( 2010-08-20 )

Source: not available

Adrian was a child prodigy, who was already sketching at the age of three. He studied at the School of Fine & Applied Arts

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